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"The important question concerning Hollywood’s imbalance is not whether good things are happening — they are — but whether each advancement inspires the developmental change necessary to make the numbers reflect the financial and creative strides being made in the industry. In 2014, people talk about the imbalance — but it will only matter if the powers that be start listening to the ever-rising voices of discontent."

5 years of Girls on Film

A look at the ongoing evolution of women-centric film in culture and Hollywood

(via theweekmagazine)

But some things haven’t changed. This week, Writers Guild of America West released employment numbers that show that the share of female writers working in film has actually decreased since 2009, reaching a dismal 15 percent. According to the annual Celluloid Ceiling Report, it’s even worse for female directors. It was already bad in 2008, when women made up only 9 percent of directors — a number that hadn’t improved in 10 years. But unbelievably, the 2013 numbers reveal that the percentage has dropped even more, to an abysmal 6 percent. This is on top of the decrease in the number of female characters and equally balanced male/female casts, and Hollywood’s ongoing four percent problem.

(via mswyrr)

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"When you’re a trans woman you are made to walk this very fine line, where if you act feminine you are accused of being a parody and if you act masculine, it is seen as a sign of your true male identity. And if you act sweet and demure, you’re accused of reinforcing patriarchal ideas of female passivity, but if you stand up for your own rights and make your voice heard, then you are dismissed as wielding male privilege and entitlement. We trans women are made to teeter on this tightrope, not because we are transsexuals, but because we are women. This is the same double bind that forces teenage girls to negotiate their way between virgin and whore, that forces female politicians and business women to be aggressive without being seen as a bitch, and to be feminine enough not to emasculate their alpha male colleagues, without being so girly as to undermine their own authority."

— Julia Serano, Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive, p 28-9  (via lugardepiedras)

(Source: bisexual-books, via postgenderfemmerobot)

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talesofthestarshipregeneration:

You can’t read about any artistic history or movement — from punk rock to 18th century poetry — without reading about someone’s teenage mistress or girlfriend. Men with big egos and senses of entitlement combined with a lack of boundaries have always chewed up and swallowed emotionally immature young girls.
 
Off the top of my head alone: Edgar Allan Poe married his 13-year-old cousin, as did Jerry Lee Lewis. Elvis Presley was obsessed with 14-year-old girls (like his would-be wife Priscilla, who was 14 when he met her) and lost interest in his sexual partners once they were no longer virgins.
 
 
Ted Nugent has admitted to a fondness for underage girls, and at one point became 17-year-old girlfriend Pele Massa’s legal guardian to avoid hassle. Marvin Gaye was 33 when he started dating 16-year-old Janis Hunter. The Eagles’ Don Henley was arrested when police found a drugged, naked 16-year-old girl at his house. Salinger dated teenage girls.
 
Iggy Pop allegedly slept with Sable Starr when she was only 13, then wrote the song “Look Away” about her. Starr went on to have relationships with Johnny Thunders of the New York Dolls and Richard Hell, all before turning 17. Chuck Berry went to jail for transporting an underage girl across state lines, and allegedly appeared in in a video urinating on a young girl in a hotel bathtub. Rob Lowe made a sex tape with a 16-year-old girl.
 
Roman Polanski plead guilty to unlawful sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl, then fled to France to escape imprisonment. Cher was 16 when she met 27-year-old Sonny Bono. Jimmy Page had a relationship with Lori Maddox, a 14-year-old groupie he proceeded to keep behind closed doors for years to avoid legal trouble. She was linked to David Bowie a year earlier.
 
Charles Dickens left his wife for an 18-year-old and then publicly slandered his betrayed wife in the newspaper. Fifty-one-year-old Doug Hutchinson married 16-year-old Courtney Stodden. Bill Wyman, the Rolling Stones’ bassist, infamously “dated” 13-year-old Mandy Smith. Mackenzie Phillips’musician dad first raped her when she was 17 or 18.
 
The above are not only just the ones that come to mind quickly, they’re just the ones who got caught. Our cultural canon is built on the backs of young girls.

Calling out the names. Fuck this shit. STOP THIS SHIT.

(via rasmalaiwin)

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ellesugars:

coagulates:

The fact that I end every sentence with ‘idk’ is a really good reflection of my self esteem

"A very specific way some young women express a sense of incompetence is by claiming ignorance, not about something specific, but in general, by uttering the words, “I don’t know.” The phrase “I don’t know” may be used as a means of filling space, changing the subject, weakening an otherwise clear statement, or contradicting a specific claim of knowledge. Some discourse theorists have claimed that “I don’t know”, used in these ways, serves a politeness or social leveling function. By liberally peppering speech with these non-conventional uses of the phrase, a speaker mitigates against the possibility that she might seem arrogant, and she can hedge statements of fact so as not to appear positional or argumentative."  —The Fabric of Internalized Sexism, Journal of Integrated Social Sciences (2009)

(via postgenderfemmerobot)

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angryseawitch:

outside of tumblr, problematic female celebrities aren’t hated because of the fucked up things they’ve said/done. they’re hated because they’re famous women. so i think we should be as critical of them as we want, but not to just uncritically join in on expressing our distaste of them in misogynistic ways, like body hatred. that’s not criticizing them for being problematic, that’s literally just joining in w/ shitty men on the fun. and it hurts regular women since it contributes to a culture of analyzing womens bodies and sexualities.

(Source: stayuglystayangry)

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"

Men want what they want.

So much of our culture caters to giving men what they want. A high school student invites model Kate Upton to attend his prom, and he’s congratulated for his audacity. A male fan at a Beyoncé concert reaches up to the stage to slap her ass because her ass is there, her ass is magnificent, and he wants to feel it. The science fiction fandom community is once again having a heated discussion, across the Internet, about the ongoing problem of sexual harassment at conventions — countless women are telling all manner of stories about how, without their consent, they are groped, ogled, lured into hotel rooms under false pretenses, physically lifted off the ground, and more.

But men want what they want. We should all lighten up.

It’s hard not to feel humorless as a woman and a feminist, to recognize misogyny in so many forms, some great and some small, and know you’re not imagining things. It’s hard to be told to lighten up because if you lighten up any more, you’re going to float the fuck away. The problem is not that one of these things is happening, it’s that they are all happening, concurrently and constantly.

These are just songs. They are just jokes. They are just movies. It’s just a hug. They’re just breasts. Smile, you’re beautiful. Can’t a man pay you a compliment? In truth, this is all a symptom of a much more virulent cultural sickness — one where women exist to satisfy the whims of men, one where a woman’s worth is consistently diminished or entirely ignored.

"

What Men Want, America Delivers - from the inimitable Roxane Gay (via ethiopienne)

(Source: jessicavalenti, via thiswontbebigondignity)

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fegeleh:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.
1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.
2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)
3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.
5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.
6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.
8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 
The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

this is hugely important

fegeleh:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.

1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.

2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)

3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.
4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.

5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.

6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.

8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 

The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

this is hugely important

(via apihtawikosisan)

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A problem in discussing feminist issues

realsocialskills:

I don’t know a solution to this. I think it’s a serious problem, but I don’t know how to talk about it in a good way.

Feminist issues can get really, really hard to talk about.

There are a lot of forms of abuse that play out in a gendered way fueled by misogyny, that have some of these attributes:

  • They’re usually done to women by men (eg: rape; stalking; sexual harassment at work)
  • Almost all of the people directly affected by them are women or girls (eg: the overwhelming majority of people who need to have abortions are women or girls)
  • They are almost always motivated by misogyny 
  • There’s a pattern of misogyny that enables them to happen
  • Most of the culture is dedicated to denying this
  • People really, really pressure everyone to pretend this isn’t a misogynistic pattern

But, for all of these things, there’s also this:

  • Some of the abusers are women (eg: there are female rapists and stalkers)
  • The same thing, or a similar thing, happens to men (there are male rape and stalking victims)
  • Some people who are affected by the things aren’t women (eg: intersex folks who can get pregnant also need access to contraception and abortion and reproductive healthcare, so do trans men and nonbinary folks who can get pregnant)
  • Some people are taught they have no right to say no for reasons other than gender (for instance, this routinely happens to both boys and girls with disabilities)

That creates a complicated problem. Here’s one aspect of it:

  • People who are harmed by these things other than as a form of male-on-female abuse tend to be erased
  • And often even don’t realize that the things that happened to them actually happened, or that it’s ok to take them seriously
  • And often the only things that they have access to are things that implicitly or even emphatically describe this as something that ONLY happens to women and is ONLY done by men
  • For instance, most of the books about learning to have boundaries are women’s self-help books written in a way that suggests that being taught not to have boundaries is always mostly the result of growing up socially perceived as female a misogynistic culture
  • And it can be hard for trans people of any gender to get anatomically appropriate medical care without facing unbearable hostility to their gender identity
  • Or for female victims of female abusers to find supportive spaces, since many women’s spaces assume that men are dangerous and women are safe
  • This can be awful situations to be in, and exposure to some kinds of feminist discourse can make it worse for people who experience this pattern of abuse in a way that doesn’t fit this model

Here’s another aspect of the problem:

  • The pattern of misogyny that creates the male-on-female forms of the abuse is very much a real thing
  • And a lot of people don’t want it to be talked about, ever (eg: MRAs, people who want to say that women are just imagining everything and that really men have it just as bad if not worse, etc)
  • And some of them use other kinds of victims as pawns. And use them to say that it’s wrong to talk about women’s issues or patterns of misogyny, because there are exceptions
  • And that’s a seriously messed up form of derailing, because misogyny is real and so are the patterns feminism describes. Gendered patterns are real, and important to talk about, even though similar things happen in ways that don’t fit those patterns
  • And, more often than not, the people saying these things don’t actually care about victims who don’t fit the patterns — they often don’t ever talk about them except to derail feminist conversations

And another aspect:

  • Sometimes people who talk about lack of representation are totally sincere
  • They often get accused of derailing when they’re not remotely doing so
  • They’re interpreted this way by people who want to derail the conversation *and* by people who want to prevent it from being derailed
  • This can make it hard for these people to ever have any space to talk about their experiences
  • Or things that contributed to them
  • Or patterns of ways they happen
  • Or ways to fight these patterns and protect people

The result ends up being that there’s some people who tend to get overlooked or shouted down by just about everyone. I don’t know a good solution to this. I think noticing the pattern might be a starting place. I wish I knew more to do about it.

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"People wonder why women don’t “fight back,” but they don’t wonder about it when women back down in arguments, are interrupted, purposefully lower and modulate their voices to express less emotion, make obvious signals that they are uninterested in conversation or being in closer physical proximity and are ignored. They don’t wonder about all those daily social interactions in which women are quieter, ignored, or invisible, because those social interactions seem normal. They seem normal to women, and they seem normal to men, because we were all raised in the same cultural pond, drinking the same Kool-Aid.

And then, all of a sudden, when women are raped, all these natural and invisible social interactions become evidence that the woman wasn’t truly raped. Because she didn’t fight back, or yell loudly, or run, or kick, or punch. She let him into her room when it was obvious what he wanted. She flirted with him, she kissed him. She stopped saying no, after a while.

These rules for social interactions that women are taught to obey are more than grease for the patriarchy wheel. Women are taught both that these rules will protect them, and that disobeying these rules results in punishment."

Another post about rape | Fugitivus

(via postgenderfemmerobot)

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browntourage:

A few weeks ago I found this album somewhat randomly while gathering music for a mixtape, and it couldn’t have been a more perfect album for Browntourage to share with you, our esteemed readers. It is a post “Arab Spring” gathering of female voices from Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and Syria weaving together the regional Arabic influences and contemporary studio productions with producers such as Olof Dreijer of The Knife and Sudanese/American producer, Oddisee. The production is on point and the message of rebellion against imperialistic and military repression still very much relevant today.

We want to introduce our new contributor, Saniya, who translates, analyzes, and contextualizes this compelling album for you.-Jaqi

"Women were, and still continue to be, in the front-lines of these revolutions, leading efforts to counter violence and exclusion from the public sphere, particularly as gender is instrumentalized for the imagining and preservation of a patriarchal nation. Art has thus functioned as a tool for women’s own self-representation and counter-narratives, of challenging and redefining womanhood through their own cultural production, and it is from within this context that Sawtuha emerges.” 

CLICK TO READ THE ESSAY!

(via cammiecat)

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indoomitably:

Let’s also focus less on how Emma Watson’s taking parts in problematic films, which she seems to be doing largely because her managers tell her it’s the only way to make it past Harry Potter, and more on how James Franco, Seth Rogan, Jonah Hill Jay whatsisface, and Cahnning Tatum made uncomfortable sex jokes and rape jokes around her until she was so uncomfortable she left halfway through filming This is the End- but by contract had to still be in the movie.

Let’s talk about how Evangeline Lilly signed onto the Hobbit movies on the condition that her character not be in a love triangle, and everyone involved rewrote the character so that she was, and she couldn’t leave. Let’s talk about how actresses are signed into films whose final products are the opposite of what they want to be a part of, and still wind up on-screen playing terrible, problematic, sexist roles, or even being sexually harassed and assaulted while on set. Let’s talk about the implications of an industry where women have no control over the part they play or the story they’re used to tell, and are forced to make difficult decisions about which producers and directors will and won’t completely screw them over.

(Source: mollyyconnollyy)

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reichenbackdatassup:

wow my brother was telling me this joke and he said

"if you’re fighting with a woman and she pulls a knife on you, just pull out the bread and cheese and meat and her womanly instincts will kick in and she’ll just make you a sandwich"

then all of a sudden our mom emerges from the kitchen holding a huge ass knife and she approaches my brother asking “sorry what was that?” and he started screaming

(via seriouslyamerica)

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kaymuhrie:

I hate how men suddenly become “male feminists” after they’ve held their baby daughters in their arms. You shouldn’t need to become the father of a little girl to understand that women are human. More than that, they still don’t even think all women are human; only their daughters. Not the women who gave them life, not the woman who gave them their daughters; only their daughters. They have to have helped create her to think that she’s human.

(Source: staticestatic, via thiswontbebigondignity)

Tags: YIKES feminism
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maarnayeri:

Stop saying that feminism is about equality. Stop trying to satiate male egos and cater to their comforts when they’re more interested in niceties from those who are crushed under the weight of a system of violence and exploitation they benefit from, who’d rather hear that their position as the top, the more worthy isn’t compromised, though it means the inherent degradation of women.

Stop trying to advantageously indoctrinate yourself into a mechanism of politics that means continued suffering of other women. Terms like “equality” is how you have women congratulating each other for finally being in the front ranks of a military responsible for continued genocidal siege and turmoil of defenseless peoples all around the world. Being “equal” to men, by the current definition of what men are supposed and expected to embody is not about liberation, its about individualization of acts, the deliberate betrayal of the very core of feminist politics, the abandonment of a communal confrontation of patriarchy, but rather a negotiation of it that allows some of us the ability of assimilation. Instead of saying “we desire to be like men” and “this is about equality” ask yourself “with the destruction of patriarchy, what are men? How will they embody such a role if there is none ascribed to them? And how can we be equal to them if they have no cohesive definition?”

No type of liberation politics can exist with the celebration of singular advances while the system remains the same, ultimately, that’s how such a system can flourish. By allowing to believe it doesn’t exist. Blatant patriarchy is easier to demolish, it makes no mistake of its ravaging of women, more insidious patriarchy however, the type that allows certain women to enter its realm is trickier, because the nature of rigid gender dynamics becomes less visible and more disheveled and respectability standards began to ask “if she made it? Why not you?”

When you ask for equality, instead of a complete dismantlement of the system in which we’d even have to be “equal” these are the questions that begin to exist.

(via postgenderfemmerobot)