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sapphicscience:

i’ve been thinking about all those posts about “we need female heroes who do girly things”/”why is the female hero always such a tomboy” and then the response posts that are like “uhhh actually we don’t really have any really masculine female heroes either” so i was trying to figure it out—what do we have, exactly?

and really what we get is women who eschew “girly” things while still managing to look like society’s ideal woman. they would never touch eyeliner (they’re too busy with Important Things), but their eyeliner is immaculate. they have a huge, varied wardrobe, but wouldn’t be caught dead actually shopping for clothes. and it reminds me of the expectation that women must be effortlessly beautiful. don’t wear makeup or you’ll seem self-absorbed—but god forbid you look like you’re not wearing makeup. it’s interesting to me, that the impossibilities imposed on female characters are the same ones imposed on real women.

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"Male fantasies, male fantasies, is everything run by male fantasies? Up on a pedestal or down on your knees, it’s all a male fantasy: that you’re strong enough to take what they dish out, or else too weak to do anything about it. Even pretending you aren’t catering to male fantasies is a male fantasy: pretending you’re unseen, pretending you have a life of your own, that you can wash your feet and comb your hair unconscious of the ever-present watcher peering through the keyhole, peering through the keyhole in your own head, if nowhere else. You are a woman with a man inside watching a woman. You are your own voyeur."

— Margaret Atwood, The Robber Bride (via corpsicles)

(Source: courcel, via imnotevilimjustwrittenthatway)

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gaypocalypse:

Diane Sawyer: So, have you thought, how many women is enough? How many women [on the Supreme Court] would be enough?
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Nine, nine. [Applause.]
Sawyer: Oh! Oh. [Laughs.]
Ginsburg: Well, there’ve been nine men there for a long long time, right? So why not nine women?

(x)

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blackfemalepresident:

if your “pro-black woman” movement does not include hoodrats & ratchet black women, because “theyre not queens/theyre setting black women back”, your movement is bullshit and I want no part of it

any movement that segregates my sisters into “good and respectable” and “bad and deserves disrespect” categories is harmful and bullshiterious 

(via postgenderfemmerobot)

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nosdrinker:

slutgarbage:

Boys who are into consensual sex and agree with feminism are so cute and I wanna kiss them all.

the bar has never been lower

(Source: bruisedbrat, via boonies)

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apihtawikosisan:

upscale-errythang:

apihtawikosisan:

scarybalkanlady:

yugosuave:

Omfg the whole bad bitch aesthetic on here has gone way too far like she works for drug cartels?? They exploit poor women as drug mules then slaughter their families when they get caught at customs and go to prison for the rest of their lives wtf she isnt some icon this shit isnt admirable at all

this is like peak liberal choice feminism tbh

the drug cartels have murdered literally tens of thousands of people in Mexico over the last decade and a good portion of the country is basically living in a war zone right now but hey, one of their hired killers apparently murders people in lipstick and heels so naturally why talk about systemic violence and the U.S. demand for drugs keeping the cartels in power when you can talk about WEAPONIZED FEMININITY!!!1!! instead

Reblogged for the spot on comments.

it’s not feminism though. I doubt she recognizes herself as a feminist. and if she does we don’t want her. that would be backwards. stop blaming shit on feminist

There are plenty of White liberal feminists who think gender equity means women in the army and on the police force and involved in other systems of violence and repression.

So yup. Discussing that foolishness. Ooooh especially the really out there ‘gun rights’ feminists.

(Source: -lsd)

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imgross-ok:

aboutwhitewomen:

If men aren’t allowed to have an opinion on abortion, then they shouldn’t have to contribute to federal funding of breast cancer research.

"if i cant control a woman’s body, then i want that body to die"

(via apihtawikosisan)

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newmodelminority:

dylandigits:

newmodelminority:

democracynow:

"Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole." Do you support the case for reparations as presented by Ta-Nehisi Coates in The Atlantic?
Democracy Now! talks to Ta-Nehesi Coates of The Atlantic about his essay, “The Case for Reparations.” Coates explores how slavery, Jim Crow segregation, and federal housing policy systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing inter-generational wealth.

His eyes look sad like he saw something he can’t unsee. #haunted. We’ve had our differences, but I still hope he is okay. #seent

He’s written recently on his blog about how he’s in his Blue Period (reference to Picasso’s 3-year somber and depressed output at the beginning of the 20th century) and that his earlier faith in the arc of history bending toward justice has been shaken irrevocably. I know that the murders of Trayvon Martin and later Jordan Davis were part of that; Coates’ son is in elementary school now, I think, and those killings had a profound effect on his writing and the tone of his work.

Well. DD Thank you for that data on the Blue period. I didn’t know that was how he saw himself.
My thoughts? I read faces. Faces and spirits. And I’ll say two things. One, if what your saying is true then my contention from 4 years ago is that much more relevant which is that he needed/needs to read Black feminist work in order to have a broader, nuanced and clear(er) understanding of the arch of US history, struggles for social justice and the future of the US. Two. I don’t see a blue period in his face. I see being bewildered. Imagine if he read and was familiar with how Barbara Smith and other  Queer, Lesbian and Straight sisters responded to Black women being murdered, by a serial killer, in Boston in the 70’s. What? Spot blown. Theories of RACE and Power in the US SUFFER when Black feminists standpoints are left out of your logic. ESPECIALLY in the US. If you’ve known that Black people, Black women, have BEEN being attacked with violence and have been resisting since we’ve been here how can you be surprised by how recalcitrant  race is in 2013? On the other hand maybe he is anticipatory the investment capital W Whiteness. and we don’t know his life like that. So Weary yes. For sure. He may be hitting his Whiteness bottom.

newmodelminority:

dylandigits:

newmodelminority:

democracynow:

"Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole." Do you support the case for reparations as presented by Ta-Nehisi Coates in The Atlantic?

Democracy Now! talks to Ta-Nehesi Coates of The Atlantic about his essay, “The Case for Reparations.” Coates explores how slavery, Jim Crow segregation, and federal housing policy systematically robbed African Americans of their possessions and prevented them from accruing inter-generational wealth.

His eyes look sad like he saw something he can’t unsee. #haunted. We’ve had our differences, but I still hope he is okay. #seent

He’s written recently on his blog about how he’s in his Blue Period (reference to Picasso’s 3-year somber and depressed output at the beginning of the 20th century) and that his earlier faith in the arc of history bending toward justice has been shaken irrevocably. I know that the murders of Trayvon Martin and later Jordan Davis were part of that; Coates’ son is in elementary school now, I think, and those killings had a profound effect on his writing and the tone of his work.

Well. DD Thank you for that data on the Blue period. I didn’t know that was how he saw himself.

My thoughts? I read faces. Faces and spirits. And I’ll say two things. One, if what your saying is true then my contention from 4 years ago is that much more relevant which is that he needed/needs to read Black feminist work in order to have a broader, nuanced and clear(er) understanding of the arch of US history, struggles for social justice and the future of the US. Two. I don’t see a blue period in his face. I see being bewildered. Imagine if he read and was familiar with how Barbara Smith and other  Queer, Lesbian and Straight sisters responded to Black women being murdered, by a serial killer, in Boston in the 70’s. What? Spot blown. Theories of RACE and Power in the US SUFFER when Black feminists standpoints are left out of your logic. ESPECIALLY in the US. If you’ve known that Black people, Black women, have BEEN being attacked with violence and have been resisting since we’ve been here how can you be surprised by how recalcitrant  race is in 2013? On the other hand maybe he is anticipatory the investment capital W Whiteness. and we don’t know his life like that. So Weary yes. For sure. He may be hitting his Whiteness bottom.

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alimarko:

Always remember that women who call themselves feminists will be accused so many times of being man-haters, but when a man kills women just for being women, he is called mentally unwell, and a madman rather than a woman-hater or misogynist. 

(via yesscoolverygoodok)

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roxanegay:

Though it is so awkward to see myself on video, here I am talking with a hottie about Bad Feminist. 

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Anonymous said: I saw the ask claiming that people only criticise women for poor acting....but I see bad actors get dragged routinely on recap sites no matter gender. YFAS fans were pretty clear that Kim Soohyun didn't match Jun Jihyun's skills. And I don't see what's sexist about pointing out that Jin Se Yeon is a bad actress based on her performances. Jaejoong's no Oscar winner but even he's better than that (and people hate Yunho's acting too). But Park Shin Hye gets unfair criticism for kissing scenes tho..

feministkdramafeels:

Hello, Anon! What you’re describing in your ask is actually a false equivalence that plagues all discussions on the treatment of women and men in the media.

A false equivalence is a logical fallacy in which one believes that because two things appear to be the same on the surface, that they are and should be treated equally but in fact, there is no evidence to suggest they are actually equal. For example, dogs and cats are both soft, furry animals, so your experience with them will be exactly the same because you treat them equally. Anyone who has been around cats and dogs knows that is untrue.

By stating that because both women and men are humans their experience and treatment is the same, you are making a false equivalence because in life women and men are not treated equally.

And when you look at that through the lens of the media, it is hard to say with any sort of legitimacy that women and men not only receive equal criticism, but that the criticism they do receive is of the same kind and intensity. Go onto any site that discusses actors, actresses, and their characters and read both the article and comments. In order to get a balanced data set, make sure you do this for several different articles.

What you will find is a data set that shows there is a bias. You will find an overwhelming about of hate for women and lukewarm criticism of men. What is also important to notice is the kind of criticism actors and characters receive. What is often excused in men will rip apart women.

Part of establishing this false equivalence is that harsh criticisms of men, like the one you mentioned with Kim Soo Hyun, are so rare that they are memorable, so they become the example to derail this argument every time when this topic is brought up when say someone wants to point out Park Shin-Hye’s kissing scenes aren’t up to their standards. It is important to notice that her male partners don’t receive the same level of hate.

It is very easy to forget that we live in a highly sexist (and racist) society. We don’t like to admit that these oppressive systems impact our thoughts and behaviors because we don’t want to believe that we are sexist and racist. We want to believe we are treating women and men equally when we complain about them but the truth is we can’t escape that our culture is built on oppression. 

The best way to combat this in ourselves is to take a step back from our assumptions and look at what is really happening. The surface is misleading.

This is why Audrey and I are so vehement in our defense of women and care very much how they are portrayed in the media. We want to live in a world where not only are female characters written well, we want the women who portray them to be treated with respect. 

~Gwynne

also the defense of the few men who do get critiqued is so swift and loud and overwhelming, while the defense of the women who get critiqued is like barely there (which is why fkdf is so great!)

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curliestofcrowns:

so Kate Beaton did a comic on Ida B. Wells and that picture there is a click through and the whole thing is basically great

curliestofcrowns:

so Kate Beaton did a comic on Ida B. Wells and that picture there is a click through and the whole thing is basically great

(via noirwallflower)

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"hooks says she asked Janet Mock if glamour was a source of power, and Mock responded “yes,” immediately. Mock explains that, to wear makeup and heels, to “pretty [herself] up,” to “claim [her] body” and to “prettify” it in the way she wants, constitutes power. Mock sees it as claiming space. As claiming power. “This little space is mine,” she says, referring to her body. “I will do it for myself. Not for the pleasure of or for the gaze of a man.” Does she gaze at herself, I wonder? Through whose eyes? Where did these images of glamour and female beauty come from?"

BELL HOOKS WILL SAVE US ALL FROM THE LONG, SLOW DEATH THAT IS POPULAR FEMINISM (via feministcurrent)

3 years ago, Moya asked me/challenged me to think about “why do we desire what we desire?” I am still stuck, but I think of that question…often.

(via newmodelminority)