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uuuuuuuugh i have to go to work tomorrow boooooooooooooooooooooooo

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(Source: caramelkane)

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We kissed.

(Source: caramelkane)

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(Source: caramelkane)

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“Alone in Love,” the 2006 adaptation of Japanese writer Hisashi Nozawa’s titular novel, took South Korea by storm. Six years later, the late Nozawa returns to airwaves once again in this Korean remake of 1995’s “Koibito Yo” (My Dear You), which follows a group of metropolitan lovers whose harbored passions clash with romance, careers and urban life. Gorgeous Park Sol Mi (Winter Sonata) stars as Seo Chan Joo, a fashion reporter trying to move forward with a wedding. But with every step forward, she comes that much closer to leaping into her past — a past in the form of her old lover. Just what exactly is love, and can it ever not be the right thing? Expect a torch song filled with aching beauty and wistful melancholy.

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youneedacat:

narciii:

Disabled people are not supposed to enjoy any aspect of being disabled.

youneedacat:

It’s this big taboo. Disabled people are supposed to be suffering, all the time. We are not supposed to enjoy anything about being disabled. If we do enjoy anything about being disabled, then people consider us suspect. They may think we are faking, but if it’s obvious enough that we are not…

Once upon a time, back in the 1940s, when men didn’t wear shorts in public for any reason, at least in the northern, white, working class town my parents grew up in, my grandfather was a bit of a weirdo. He wore bermuda shorts in public, even when no one really knew where he got them. He wore stripes with plaids and polkadots and whatever else he could afford, but without a lot of sense for what other people thought of it. So he’s at a diner, and a woman leans over to her husband, and says “Do you see that man, George? He must be VERY wealthy. No one else would dare dress that way.” 

My parents said it over and over when I was growing up, and I think now, gosh, what a weird lesson to drill into your child, but there it was, explicitly, word for word, not just in the subconscious lessons about class that I am still unpicking slowly, “if you’re poor, you’re crazy. If you’re rich, you’re eccentric.” So you better be rich if you’re going to be weird. 

I’ve never really thought about this from this particular angle, but I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the difference between “shameful disability services” and “luxury goods” is often just money.  I don’t think I am capable of mowing a lawn. I’m terrified of lawn mowers, going near one turned off is enough to make my hands clammy. The noise, even from inside a building, makes my heart race and my vision blur and I just.. I can’t. But because I can afford $35 every few weeks, it’s a luxury good that a nice father and son team come out and take care of my lawn. But I still wouldn’t be able to do it even if I couldn’t afford to pay someone to help me. 

It’s totally normal, even idealized, to pay someone to wash your hair at a salon, but to have a carer do it because you can’t? Suddenly that’s shameful and weird. 

If I have a child I cannot manage alone, I would be shamed for having the child in the first place, shamed for daring to be a weak or incompetent or inadequate mother, I might even have a child taken away or denied to me via the foster system. This is a completely rational fear, one lived every single day by disabled parents, parents or people who’d like to be parents who face sterilization. Particularly disabled and poor people of color. But if I am wealthy, I can hire a private nanny, or a private nurse if my child is disabled, and suddenly child care assistance becomes a luxury good. Even if it is exactly the same, done by exactly the same person, for exactly the same reason.

So yeah I am thinking a lot lately about how ableism intersects with classism. And how disgusting it is to have to cling to capitalism because the alternatives leave me without the resources I use to maintain good functionality.  

I had a shrink once.

Not a good one, mind you.  He’s the one who tried to convince me I would never be an adult.

But another thing he told me:

"Rich people get to be eccentric.  Everyone else is crazy.  You’re not rich and you will never be rich.  So you’re going to have to be crazy."

I never quite understood where he was going with that.  He used to say weird shit like that and “the martyrdom of madness is a misplaced loyalty” and other weird sayings, and call it “planting seeds”.  But all it did was confuse me.

(via imnotevilimjustwrittenthatway)

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Seriously, man, just retire.

(Source: crowderava)

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thiswontbebigondignity:

srh2pm:

koreaboo:

Check out this clip from an episode of “Everybody Kimchi”, a k-drama thats about the kimchi industry.

In the episode, a grandma kimchi slaps the crap out of this guy.

There are some people who I wish to kimchi slap.

This is so going on the bucket list.

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The corners of Soujiro’s eyes crinkled in his habitual grin. A true one, Kenshin knew; he’d known the boy too long to be fooled by his false smiles. It was an old habit, smiling in the face of pain, and it brought Soujiro comfort.

Kenshin smiled as he entered, hiding the sudden shriek of worry in his bones at the closeness and lack of easy exits.

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arachnidian:

bitcheslovecereal:

I said a heALTHY SNACK REBECCA

holy infant so tender and mild

arachnidian:

bitcheslovecereal:

I said a heALTHY SNACK REBECCA

holy infant so tender and mild

(Source: 7fffd4, via imnotevilimjustwrittenthatway)

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Marriage Not Dating 8-1

gwynnemeeks:

The amount of effort Jang-Mi and Gi-Tae are putting in to hide their boyfriend is fantastic. The amount of snuggling between Yeo-Reum and Gi-Tae was beautiful.

But Mama’s change of tactics is wonderful.

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AU, sequel to Invictus. Six years later, the war is over. But the fight hasn’t ended - dark plots and old grudges simmer below the surface, and the sweet peace of the new world might be nothing more than a pleasant perfume masking the rot of the old. And as much as the inhabitants of the Kamiya school would rather nurse their wounds, they may have no choice but to take up arms once more…

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"A woman is not written in braille, you don’t have to touch her to know her."

— Unknown

(Source: quotethat, via boonies)

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"An African-American welfare-dependent mother of three told me this story about the birth of her son with Down syndrome. She had been planning to put the newborn up for adoption, a decision she had reached shortly before his birth, due to the domestic stress and violence with which she was living. When the baby was born and diagnosed, a white social worker came to see her about placing the child. The mother asked what would become of her baby and was told, ‘We’ll probably find a rural farm family to take him.’ ‘Then what?’ she queried. ‘He’ll grow up outside, knowing about crops and animals,’ was the reply. ‘Then what,’ the mother repeated. ‘Maybe he’ll even grow up to work on that farm,’ the social worker replied. ‘Sounds like slavery to me,’ answered the mother, who decided to take her baby home. This imagery and its legacy contrast strongly with the stories many white mothers tell, in which they fantasize a peaceful, rural life ‘in nature’ as the perfect placement for their children with Down syndrome."

in Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America by Rayna Rapp, p. 271. 

This paragraph like, knocked the wind out of me. 

(via this-reading-by-lightning)

(via imnotevilimjustwrittenthatway)

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Nothing happened to me personally, I just…

(Source: boyd-crowders)